Cursus by Cursus

This wonderful album by Chris Whitehead is my favourite album of 2019 so far. It has been released by TQ Zine.

You can get the download by ordering the latest copy of TQ or you can buy the album directly from the TQ Bandcamp page. Any income is being donated to TQN-aut by the artist to help fund other releases by artists who need financial support to do so

Crabdale

I took myself up to Crabdale today to search for a couple of cup marked stones that are marked on the NYMNP Historic Environment Map.

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The valley sides are covered in a thick mat of dead bracken so finding any stones, let alone cup marked stones, was a little problematic.

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This was the only stone I could find that bears any resemblance to a cup marked stone. I suspect the origins of the cup marks on this stone are relatively recent, perhaps someone using the stone for target practice.

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I failed to find the stones mentioned on the map  There are a number of other stones in this area so I will be back again.

As I was heading back a pair of cuckoos flew past me, landed nearby and sang me out of the valley.

Cockfield Fell

Cockfield Map

Cockfield Fell is described as “one of the most important early industrial landscapes in Britain”. In addition to four Iron Age (or Romano-British) settlement enclosures, there is evidence within the landscape of early coal mines (the Bishop of Durham licensed mining here at least as early as 1303), medieval agricultural field patterns, centuries of quarrying activity, a railway line established in the 1830s and several earlier tramways All together, Cockfield Fell constitutes England’s largest Scheduled Ancient Monument, described as ‘an incomparable association of field monuments relating to the Iron settlement history and industrial evolution of a northern English County’. One reason for its preservation – unusual for a lowland fell – is that it was not subject to enclosure in the 18th or 19th centuries, perhaps due to its highly industrialised past. Source

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The fell is ablaze with fragrant golden whin

The Cleveland Dyke outcrops on the fell and was quarried for roadstone.

The remains of the Gaunless Viaduct

Gaunless ME gaghenles ‘useless’ (from ON gagnlauss). The name may refer to scarcity of fish or the like. English Place-Names. Eilert Ekwall. 1959 

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Coal was mined on the fell from the early medieval period until the late nineteenth century

Beehive coke ovens on the valley floor

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A beautiful Cob keeps me company

Map reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland

Many thanks to Graham Vasey for showing me around this wonderful place

pendant — taphonomy

An excellent piece written by my friend and occasional collaborator Chris Whitehead

Being invited to contribute to this compilation was a great honour as TQ covers those dark corners of music where the light rarely penetrates. Also with the quality of the other contributors, I knew I’d be in good company. For our interpretations there were three covers to choose from. I chose TQ 10 because it […]

via pendant — taphonomy

Ravenscar – Chris Whitehead

 

Ravenscar stands 600ft above the restless North Sea. To many it is simply a stopping off point between Whitby and Scarborough, commanding expansive views of the beautiful North Yorkshire coastline. Yet this place is also a canvas on which the overlapping layers of history have left their fingerprints.
The recordings that form this work were collected over two years during various seasons and in a range of weather conditions. Natural materials collected from the site were manipulated in several ways to add a sense of intimacy and perspective.
Although the piece is intended to be listened to as an unbroken whole, five distinct phases are passed through.. Read More and buy here

Wade’s Causeway – Chris Whitehead

wades-causeway

This arrived today, as with all of Chris’s recordings, it is delicate, atmospheric and rather beautiful.

The disc is available to buy from the Semperflorens website 

From the sleeve notes

All sounds used in this composition were recorded on Wheeldale Moor in North Yorkshire, England. Amongst the wild heather a sinuous, linear stone structure known as Wade’s Causeway crosses the windswept land like a mile long scar.

At first thought to be a Roman road, the origin of Wade’s Causeway now seems less certain. many hold it to be a Neolithic or Bronze Age boundary structure, or possibly the remains of a later Medieval road.

Wade was a mythical giant said to dwell near Whitby. His presence deeply permiates the folklore of the area.

Many thanks to Chris Corner for his advice and for mastering Wade’s Causeway

Mark Peter Wright – South Gare

From Sensate – A Journal for Critical Media Practice

Between 2011 and 2014 I gathered environmental sound recordings from South Gare, a man-made stretch of land along the North East coast of England. These recordings formed part of a doctoral research project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and undertaken at Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP), University of the Arts, London.

The final and on-going act of research involved rebroadcasting the collected sounds back into the site before deleting them. The two films presented here examine the process and context of the work. They are audio-visual performance essays, constructed within the screen of a laptop in real-time. (Mark Peter Wright).

Mark Peter Wright’s fascinating work can be seen here Sensate Journal – Mark Peter Wright

Thanks to Chris Whitehead for this