St Agnes Church – Easterside

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St Agnes Church Easterside was built in 1967. The Church was designed by Robert Mortimer of Northallerton. The steel-framed pyramid was supposed to reflect the product of local industry.

The church was built with money donated to the Church of England by Agnes Spencer-Whitfield. Agnes was born in Marton, whilst living in Leeds, she met Thomas Spencer and the couple were married in 1892. Thomas Spencer and his business partner Michael Marks were the founders of Marks and Spencer. Following the death of her husband, Agnes moved back to Middlesbrough and lived in a house on The Grove, Marton. Agnes died in 1957 and was buried in the graveyard of St. Cuthberts church, Marton

The church is currently unused and showing the signs of neglect, the last service held here was in 2019. Over the years, thieves have stripped some of the roofing panels under the mistaken belief that they were made of copper sheet. The panels are actually made of copper covered felt and are of little value.

The church dominates the housing estate that surrounds it. The people who live around the church are confronted with its sad, gradual decay on a daily basis.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt would be wonderful if this building could be restored and given back to the community as a useable space but I suspect the history of this building may end in a mound of rubble.

 

Unease by Ivan the Tolerable

This soundtracked my walk from Redcar to Saltburn today, it’s a bit good.

A message from Oli

Happy Bandcamp no-fees day! I made a new EP and its out today so i can raise the funds to replace my 8-track machine which has all but died after 15 years hard labour. So if you wanna buy it, do it today as all the money goes to the artists for the rest of the day. Its pay what you like so all donations are welcome, and if you are skint and still want it, well thats ok too!

 

The Black Path

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The Black Path is a track that runs for most of its route beside the Middlesbrough to Redcar railway line. It starts just behind the Navigation Pub in Middlesbrough and runs to the mouth of the River Tees. It also makes up the final stretch of the Teesdale Way, a long distance footpath that follows the river Tees from its source on Cross Fell to the sea. Although it is now seen as a leisure path it has a legacy that predates the formation of England itself.

The path follows the southern bank of the Tees, from the crossing point at Newport, to the mouth of the river. It is a route that has made up a boundary between many kingdoms, the earliest of which may have been that of the Celtic Briton kingdom of Gododdin or Hen Ogledd, a name which means ‘the old north’1039px-Northumbria.rise.600.700

In the late 5th century it followed the boundary between of the Anglian Kingdom of Deira to the south and the rival Kingdom of Bernicia to the north. These two territories were later combined to form the Kingdom of Northumbria.

England_878

Later, the Vikings founded the Kingdom of York, which stretched from the Humber to the Tees, so the paths route once again marked a significant northeastern boundary. The final ruler of the Kingdom of York was the wonderfully named Eric Bloodaxe, a Viking who could claim to have been the last true king of the North. The Kingdom of York gradually became the county of Yorkshire and the path marked the final land section of its northeastern corner.

Middleton Warrior

During the Norman Conquest, the English rebel’s camp of refuge was situated close to the path on Coatham Marshes. It may well have been the route that the rebels used to escape from William the Conqueror when he and his army rode to the camp to in an attempt to wipe the rebels out, an action that eventually led to the infamous Harrying of the North.

Camp

From the Medieval period onwards the path was used by sailors to travel to and from ships at the ports of Coatham, Dabholm, Cargo Fleet and Newport, the path then became known as the Sailors Trod. The name appears in the early histories and maps of the new town of Middlesbrough.

Sailors trod OS 1853 enlarged-2

During the industrial age, the path was used by workers as a convenient route to many industrial sites that had grown up along the railway track and river bank. This is when it became known as the Black Path, named for the industrial grime that lined the route.

a memory

Today the path is only used for leisure purposes. I believe that it is probably one of the most interesting public footpaths in the county as it winds its way through the industrial hinterlands of Teesside. I have walked the path many times and have recently noted the re-wilding of the area, I have seen foxes and hares on the path even once saw a deer at clay lane. The slag surrounding the path has decomposed to form lime-rich soils which support plants that you cannot find anywhere else in our area, their seeds were carried through the narrow corridor by trains arriving with cargoes of limestone used as flux in the iron industries along the track.

Black Path Train 2

If you have never walked the path I suggest you give it a go, it provides a wonderful insight into our industrial heritage and takes you to places that you cannot reach by any other means.

Coke oven triptych

 

Paintings –

The Black Path by Bob Mitchell. 2016

Coke Oven Triptych by Kirsty O’Brien. Painted as the Clay Lane Coke Ovens were closing in 2016

Maps

Northumbria Map Attribution – A compiled visualization from various public sources, CC BY-SA 3.0, link

England Map Attribution – link

Other Maps – Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland