Howe Hill, Felixkirk

Howe Hill is a prominent mound in the centre of the village. It was previously thought to be a Norman earthwork or Motte but is actually a prehistoric burial mound dating from the Late Neolithic period to the Late Bronze Age. The site is still marked on the modern maps as a Motte.

The barrow has a beautiful tree growing on it and sits upon a natural knoll that has been bisected by the main road into the village. The primary views from the barrow are to the west across the Vale of Mowbray to the distant Pennines.

There is a Norman connection with the village, the local church was rebuilt in the mid-nineteenth century contains a number of Romanesque carved stones including this lovely capital depicting foliate heads.

Hand Stone

Heading north from Hutton-le-Hole to Castleton. I stopped to enjoy the last rays of the sun as it dropped below the distant Pennines.

West Face – Road to Kirby Moor side RR

South Face – RW

East Face – Road to Pickrin or Malton

North Face – Road to Gisbrough

Darlington – Cummins

Both the former Engine Factory and its landscape are Grade II Listed.

The final image is of the chimney at the Cummins Manufacturing Facility which is next door to the former engine factory.

Former Engine Factory. Constructed 1964-5. Designed by Kevin Roche, John Dinkerloo and Associates. Structural frame of exposed Cor-ten steel weathered to a brown, patina grey-brown tinted glass, fixed with neoprene gaskets. Single storey building rectangular in plan, divided into office and workshop areas by a service core. Flat roof. Floor to ceiling glazing, each vertical glazing panel divided into five horizontal lights. Structural steel frame of ‘I’ beams set proud of glazing, which forms continuous surface behind frame. Projecting ‘cornice’ of steel, and below this, at intersections with vertical members are expressed the jutting beam-ends of the roof supports. Central entrance to left return comprising 2 pairs of fully glazed doors, each pair occupying one bay of glazing. Tall rectangular chimney of Cor-ten steel to left side of front elevation, slightly in front of elevation. Interior also of note retaining original internal partitions of brown-painted steel and glass, and original strip lighting arranged in rows. Roof structure designed to permit services to be run between the main structural beams and those of the roof deck. First use in a British building of Cor-ten steel, and first large scale use in Britain of neoprene gaskets in a building.

Listing Details from Historic England

Welcome the Lucky Bird

To-night it is the New Year’s night, to-morrow is the day, And we are come for our right and for our ray, As we used to do in old King Henry’s day. Sing, fellows, sing Hagman heigh !

If you go to the bacon-flitch, cut me a good bit, Cut, cut and low, beware of your man ; Cut, and cut round, beware of your thumb, That I and my merry men may haye some. Sing, fellows, sing Hagman heigh !

If you go to the black ark, bring me ten mark, Ten mark, ten pound, throw it down upon the ground, That I and my merry men may have some. Sing, fellows, sing Hagman heigh !

If New Year’s Eve night wind blows south,

it betokenth warmth and growth;

If west, much mild and fish in the sea;

If north, more cold and storms there will be;

If east, will bear much fruit;

If north-east, flee it, man and brute.

Happy New Year Everyone

Size matters…Yorkshire Megaliths & Cumbria’s Prehistoric Monuments

I recently saw this wonderful illustration of Yorkshire Megaliths. I contacted the author, Adam Morgan Ibbotson, and he kindly sent me a copy.

I was rather chuffed, Adam wrote one of my favourite books of 2021, Cumbria’s Prehistoric Monuments. It’s a lovely book, comprehensive, very readable with beautiful photographs, maps and illustrations. If prehistory and big old stones are your thing, you’ll love this. You can buy it here