Standing up for standing stones

The official blog for the North York Moors National Park

Nick Mason – Archaeology Officer

In the last couple of Monuments for the Future inspired blogs, we’ve looked at the hillforts and barrows of the North York Moors. This time we’ll ponder another monument type which often springs to mind when we think of prehistoric archaeology visible in the landscape today: standing stones.

The North York Moors has an abundance of stones set upright in the ground for various reasons. Not all of these stones are prehistoric: indeed the Historic Environment Record records 161 individual stones across the park recorded as ‘standing stones’, of which 129 are of likely prehistoric origin. But there are a further 1459 monuments recorded as ‘boundary stones’ with a medieval or later explanation. The distinction between standing stone and boundary stone is not always completely clear, as we shall see below, but these figures do mean that erected stones of one sort or another account…

View original post 967 more words

Edgelandia

Iron, salt, ships, chemicals – and now birds – A new arts project explores Teesside’s industrial landscape

Artist and poet Thomas Pearson uncovers the industrial heritage of Teesside in a new project, Brine Field, opening at RSPB Saltholme on 25 May.

12 white obelisks appear amid the reedbeds and wet grasslands of RSPB Saltholme as part of Thomas Pearson’s explorations of the environment, history and industrial heritage of the site. These striking sculptural monuments are designed to commemorate the salt found deep below this remarkable landscape, echoing the brine derricks which were used to extract it. Saltholme is now a popular destination for birdwatchers, local families and visitors to Teesside, and is home to numerous birds species including common terns, lapwings, peregrines and water rails.

Details here Edgelandia