Cursus by Cursus

This wonderful album by Chris Whitehead is my favourite album of 2019 so far. It has been released by TQ Zine.

You can get the download by ordering the latest copy of TQ or you can buy the album directly from the TQ Bandcamp page. Any income is being donated to TQN-aut by the artist to help fund other releases by artists who need financial support to do so

pendant — taphonomy

An excellent piece written by my friend and occasional collaborator Chris Whitehead

Being invited to contribute to this compilation was a great honour as TQ covers those dark corners of music where the light rarely penetrates. Also with the quality of the other contributors, I knew I’d be in good company. For our interpretations there were three covers to choose from. I chose TQ 10 because it […]

via pendant — taphonomy

Ravenscar – Chris Whitehead

 

Ravenscar stands 600ft above the restless North Sea. To many it is simply a stopping off point between Whitby and Scarborough, commanding expansive views of the beautiful North Yorkshire coastline. Yet this place is also a canvas on which the overlapping layers of history have left their fingerprints.
The recordings that form this work were collected over two years during various seasons and in a range of weather conditions. Natural materials collected from the site were manipulated in several ways to add a sense of intimacy and perspective.
Although the piece is intended to be listened to as an unbroken whole, five distinct phases are passed through.. Read More and buy here

Happy New Year

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I’d just like to wish all my readers a very Happy New Year and thank you for taking the time to visit my blog. 2016 has been a pretty fruitful year for me, I started the year curating The Black Path exhibition at the House of Blah Blah gallery and finished the year with the release of the music from the project.

 I’d like to thank all the people who have helped and inspired me throughout the year and look forward to continuing in 2017 where we will see the start of a new project and hopefully an exhibition in 2018.

 All the best for 2017

Gavin

I wish you a merry Christmas,

And a happy New year,

A pantry of roast beef,

And a barrel of beer

*

Trad – Cleveland

Source W. Henderson 1879

 

Tonight is the New Year’s night, tomorrow is the day,

And we are come for our right and for our ray,

As we used to do in old King Henry’s day.

Sing fellows, sing Hagman heigh!

*

If you go to the bacon fitch, cut me a good bit,

Cut, cut and low, beware of your man;

Cut and cut round, beware of your thumb,

That I and my merry men may have some.

Sing fellows, sing Hagman heigh!

*

If you go to the black ark, bring me ten mark,

Ten mark, ten pound, throw it down upon the ground,

That I and my merry men may have some.

Sing fellows, sing Hagman heigh!

*

Trad – North Yorkshire

Source W. Henderson 1879

Utterances

utterances

For the fourth year in a row, and rapidly becoming a Christmas tradition, Richard Sanderson has released a themed compilation of tracks on the wonderful Linear Obsessional label. The collection is described as The fourth of Linear Obsessional’s annual “Open Access” compilations of tracks exactly two minutes long. This time the theme was the human voice. 
112 tracks from around the globe exploring all manner of approaches to the sounds of the “first instrument” 

The collection is free to download and can be found here 

Wade’s Causeway – Chris Whitehead

wades-causeway

This arrived today, as with all of Chris’s recordings, it is delicate, atmospheric and rather beautiful.

The disc is available to buy from the Semperflorens website 

From the sleeve notes

All sounds used in this composition were recorded on Wheeldale Moor in North Yorkshire, England. Amongst the wild heather a sinuous, linear stone structure known as Wade’s Causeway crosses the windswept land like a mile long scar.

At first thought to be a Roman road, the origin of Wade’s Causeway now seems less certain. many hold it to be a Neolithic or Bronze Age boundary structure, or possibly the remains of a later Medieval road.

Wade was a mythical giant said to dwell near Whitby. His presence deeply permiates the folklore of the area.

Many thanks to Chris Corner for his advice and for mastering Wade’s Causeway