The Creek

The Creek documentary tells the story of a community of fishermen and their families  who built a series of boat-houses and cabins on the north bank of Greatham Creek at the turn of the 20th century, and was abandoned in the early 1980’s. Through interviews with former residents, the photographer Ian Macdonald (who produced a significant body of work at the creek), archive photographs, and location filming, The Creek presents a deeply engaging, moving, and thought provoking film about the Teesside salt-marsh landscape and a unique community that flourished there for nearly a century.  Ultimately, the film is an affirming  celebration of a way of life in a self-built arcadia.

Details here

Here But Not Here: Lost Histories of the Tees – A film by David Bates

‘Here But Not Here: Lost Histories of the Tees’ is a short documentary film by David Bates with music by The Kara Sea. The film was essentially a product of three years of walking up and down the River Tees on hot, sunny summer days with my small Panasonic camcorder; enthused and inspired by seeing Patrick Keiller’s ‘Robinson’ trilogy several years ago, my aims were to capture the elation I felt in exploring that strange, beautiful landscape, and to explore something of the history, culture and identity of the river and its people. The film was first shown at ‘Undisciplining: Conversations from the Edges’ at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in June 2018.

David Bates

MIMA Exhibition -Teesside World Exposition of Art and Technology

Teesside World Exposition of Art and Technology is an urgent reaction to the recent closure of Redcar’s steelworks and a bid to make a positive contribution to the future of industry in the North East region.

Capturing the industrial character of Teesside, the exhibition shows how it has formed, from the extraction of raw materials to production, as well as the import/export of goods.

The gallery features the activity of various regional companies alongside a makerspace, archival material drawn from Teesside Archives, the Central Library and the Dorman Museum, and works from artists such as Aikaterini Gegisian, Adrián Melis, David Mulholland, David Watson, Eva Fàbregas, Farid Rasulov, Goldin+Senneby, Hackney Flashers, Mikhail Karikis, MVRD, Norman Appleton, Philip Boville and Len Tabner.

Teesside has always been defined by its industry and has history of making. The eminent past and economic future of the area is explored through historical documents and artefacts, contrasted with a showcase of new industrial technology and works by artists who have portrayed Teesside’s steelworks.

The Exhibition runs until the 9th of October

Link to MIMA

Mural

Saltburn – End of the Pier 1986

pier

A melancholy documentary captures down and out-of-season pleasures and subdued gentility at a select seaside town on the wintry North East coast. Lulled by a soundtrack of waves, time passes slowly for the men who bait and fish from the Victorian pier, scan the barren beach with metal detectors, and harvest sea coal in the cruel shadow of the distant steel works. The Realpolitik of Thatcher’s Britain is just beneath the surface of this lyrical 1980s portrait of Saltburn.

Watch here

O Lucky Man!

O_Lucky_Man!
A number of early scenes in Lindsay Anderson’s 1973 film were filmed in and around Middlesbrough, particularly the South Bank area.
Oh Lucky Man 2
Malcolm McDowell’s character travelling salesman, Mick Travis, drives towards South Bank with the Clay Lane blast furnaces in the distance.
Oh Lucky Man 1
Here Mick drives into Cochranes works at Cargo Fleet
Oh Lucky Man 3
Mick driving along the A19. Prior to the widening of the road, the Cameron’s Brewery ‘You are now entering Strongarm Country’ sign was a very recognisable landmark on the section of the road between Middlesbrough and Billingham