The Black Path

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The Black Path is a track that runs for most of its route beside the Middlesbrough to Redcar railway line. It starts just behind the Navigation Pub in Middlesbrough and runs to the mouth of the River Tees. It also makes up the final stretch of the Teesdale Way, a long distance footpath that follows the river Tees from its source on Cross Fell to the sea. Although it is now seen as a leisure path it has a legacy that predates the formation of England itself.

The path follows the southern bank of the Tees, from the crossing point at Newport, to the mouth of the river. It is a route that has made up a boundary between many kingdoms, the earliest of which may have been that of the Celtic Briton kingdom of Gododdin or Hen Ogledd, a name which means ‘the old north’1039px-Northumbria.rise.600.700

In the late 5th century it followed the boundary between of the Anglian Kingdom of Deira to the south and the rival Kingdom of Bernicia to the north. These two territories were later combined to form the Kingdom of Northumbria.

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Later, the Vikings founded the Kingdom of York, which stretched from the Humber to the Tees, so the paths route once again marked a significant northeastern boundary. The final ruler of the Kingdom of York was the wonderfully named Eric Bloodaxe, a Viking who could claim to have been the last true king of the North. The Kingdom of York gradually became the county of Yorkshire and the path marked the final land section of its northeastern corner.

Middleton Warrior

During the Norman Conquest, the English rebel’s camp of refuge was situated close to the path on Coatham Marshes. It may well have been the route that the rebels used to escape from William the Conqueror when he and his army rode to the camp to in an attempt to wipe the rebels out, an action that eventually led to the infamous Harrying of the North.

Camp

From the Medieval period onwards the path was used by sailors to travel to and from ships at the ports of Coatham, Dabholm, Cargo Fleet and Newport, the path then became known as the Sailors Trod. The name appears in the early histories and maps of the new town of Middlesbrough.

Sailors trod OS 1853 enlarged-2

During the industrial age, the path was used by workers as a convenient route to many industrial sites that had grown up along the railway track and river bank. This is when it became known as the Black Path, named for the industrial grime that lined the route.

a memory

Today the path is only used for leisure purposes. I believe that it is probably one of the most interesting public footpaths in the county as it winds its way through the industrial hinterlands of Teesside. I have walked the path many times and have recently noted the re-wilding of the area, I have seen foxes and hares on the path even once saw a deer at clay lane. The slag surrounding the path has decomposed to form lime-rich soils which support plants that you cannot find anywhere else in our area, their seeds were carried through the narrow corridor by trains arriving with cargoes of limestone used as flux in the iron industries along the track.

Black Path Train 2

If you have never walked the path I suggest you give it a go, it provides a wonderful insight into our industrial heritage and takes you to places that you cannot reach by any other means.

Coke oven triptych

 

Paintings –

The Black Path by Bob Mitchell. 2016

Coke Oven Triptych by Kirsty O’Brien. Painted as the Clay Lane Coke Ovens were closing in 2016

Maps

Northumbria Map Attribution – A compiled visualization from various public sources, CC BY-SA 3.0, link

England Map Attribution – link

Other Maps – Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland

Death of Steel 1875-2010 Ray Lonsdale

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High and dry in twenty ten. The options roll out but none appeal. he needs his son to feel alive

Seven Pounds of Hope and Five Ounces of Fear by Ray Lonsdale

Death of steeli

They may be men of steel but they are men with loves, responsibilities and nowhere to go. They are men who make things…things that have built countries.

Wipe Clean with a Soft Cloth by Ray Lonsdale

Death of steel

No more smoke, dirt, noise or ugly views and peaceful in the job centre queues.

An Arm Full of Sharp Things by Ray Lonsdale

Cargo Fleet

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Iron and steel making ended at Cargo Fleet in 1973 when the British Steel Corporation moved steel production to Lackenby resulting in two thousand workers losing their jobs. Parts of the works remained open until the gates were finally closed in the 1980’s.

The Black Path

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The (Middlesbrough) Corporationreceived the Royal Assent on the 7th July 1856 to an Improvement Act which gave power to divide the town into wards, to light the district, enlarge the market and to let off the market tolls, to appoint an Inspector of Weights and Measures, to establish a public wharf and ferry, to adopt bye-laws for the layout of streets, and to divert a sailors’ trod between Middlesbrough and Cargo Fleet, and gave power to purchase the gas works.
It was in 1855 that the Middlesbrough Owners tried to stop the path to Cargo Fleet, and on 10th April 1855 the Corporation demanded the removal of the obstructions. In February 1856 the Owners agreed to pay all costs for its diversion. It was not until 9th April 1861 that the riverside sailors’ trod, which ran through a brickyard on the Pennyman Marshes, was diverted along a route parallel with the railway. This path became known as the Black Path.

The History Of Middlesbrough.
William Lillie.
1968

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O Lucky Man!

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A number of early scenes in Lindsay Anderson’s 1973 film were filmed in and around Middlesbrough, particularly the South Bank area.
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Malcolm McDowell’s character travelling salesman, Mick Travis, drives towards South Bank with the Clay Lane blast furnaces in the distance.
Oh Lucky Man 1
Here Mick drives into Cochranes works at Cargo Fleet
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Mick driving along the A19. Prior to the widening of the road, the Cameron’s Brewery ‘You are now entering Strongarm Country’ sign was a very recognisable landmark on the section of the road between Middlesbrough and Billingham