TEESSIDE MUSIC SCENE DIAGRAM by Kingsley Chapman

Smaller+version

A limited first edition print (one of fifty) on paper (210gsm) – available in A3 or A2 size – of Chapman’s 2018 massively detailed diagram of the Teesside music scene in which he tried to link every band and musician he could by the members they shared.

What started out as a small personal project born out of love for the local music scene quickly became a huge regional investigation driven by an incredible amount of online suggestions from musicians and fans. The result is a diagram that will never truly be complete or reliably accurate but is impressive never the less.

First displayed at the Stockton Calling festival in 2018 at the Georgian Theatre in Stockton-on-Tees, this version has been photographed for Trashterpiece by Nick Wesson.

Each print is signed and numbered by the artist. Packaged in a postal tube, signed for 1st Class.

Details Here

The Unblinking Eye

55 Years of Space Operations on Fylingdales Moor.

Michael Mulvihill

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The Whitby Museum at Pannett Park is one of my favourite places to spend a couple of  hours so when I saw a flyer for this exhibition I headed over the moors at the first opportunity.

The two nice ladies at the desk said to me ‘it’s probably not what you were expecting, it’s an artists response to the Fylingdales site.’

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The exhibition is the result of Michael Mulvihill’s three years of exploring the objects in the sites archive and the history of RAF Fylingdales.  I enjoyed the exhibition, if you go I would recommend that you read the accompanying booklet, which is excellent.

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The exhibition runs from the 3rd of August to the 3rd of November. There is also a public program of events which can be found here 

Two Minutes to Midnight – Richard Clay explores why we are no longer afraid of nuclear annihilation, and whether we should be.

On reflection, the objects on display will have a different meaning depending on your own personal experience. I was born in the 1960s, there was a civil defence siren located on the perimeter of my primary school playground, the four minute warning and the Doomsday Clock were ever-present in our lives. The threat of a nuclear attack was a very real one, the RAF Fylingdales early warning station was a constant reminder of this.

https://teessidepsychogeography.wordpress.com/2018/03/12/a-postcard-from-the-cold-war/

Pannett

Edgelandia

Iron, salt, ships, chemicals – and now birds – A new arts project explores Teesside’s industrial landscape

Artist and poet Thomas Pearson uncovers the industrial heritage of Teesside in a new project, Brine Field, opening at RSPB Saltholme on 25 May.

12 white obelisks appear amid the reedbeds and wet grasslands of RSPB Saltholme as part of Thomas Pearson’s explorations of the environment, history and industrial heritage of the site. These striking sculptural monuments are designed to commemorate the salt found deep below this remarkable landscape, echoing the brine derricks which were used to extract it. Saltholme is now a popular destination for birdwatchers, local families and visitors to Teesside, and is home to numerous birds species including common terns, lapwings, peregrines and water rails.

Details here Edgelandia

Project Lono

 

Project Lono is a collaborative experiment between electronic musician S.J. Forth and poet Bob Beagrie, who are exploring the integration of the spoken word with original music and soundscapes.

Viva Talbot

Embed from Getty Images

https://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/local-news/long-forgotten-legacy-artist-viva-3694302

https://marylaura86.wordpress.com/tag/viva-talbot/

 

 

Wilderness Way pt.1

I went to see the Wilderness Way exhibition at MIMA today.

This exhibition treats Margaret Thatcher’s visit to Teesside in 1987 as a starting point to reflect on the 1980’s, a decade that shaped the way we live now. Art, film, music and archival materials examine themes of class struggle, agency, racial division, and protest.

Mima Users Guide.

I left my teens behind in 1981, along with many of my family and friends I experienced the raw edge of the decade through redundancy, unemployment and hardship. I was keen to see how MIMA’s curators would explore these troubled times.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The themes in this exhibition leave a huge area to cover, any one of them could have been the subject of a large exhibition, so I was expecting something a little larger with more material. Despite this, the exhibition is worth visiting, it contains some thought-provoking pieces.

I found the piece on the Cumbrian Iron Ore Miners to be extremely powerful and disturbing. Using official documents, claim forms, Doctor’s letters and a death certificate, it documents industrial disease and the struggle for compensation from a system that has little regard for the hardships being endured by disabled ex-miners and their families. Even when a miner prematurely dies of lung disease, his widow is denied compensation. The narrative seemed to belong in the black days of the 1930’s rather than the 1980’s.

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Mike Figgis’s film of the The Battle of Orgreave is equally powerful. Footage of  the re-enactment of the battle is cut with interviews and commentary which caused me to reflect on the continued struggle of people who are still being treated with little or no regard by an ideologically-driven conservative government.