Sunshine and Rain – Billingham to Haverton Hill

The last time I walked this route with my camera I ended up with detective constable visiting my house.

The weather changes every 5 minutes.

This is one of the most extraordinary of experiences, a sight almost unique in England. On either side of the road are the works, steaming and sizzling – tall steel chimneys, great cylinders, pipes everywhere. The road goes on and on, to Haverton Hill and Port Clarence: there are acres and acres of this remarkable landscape.

County Durham. A Shell Guide. Henry Thorold. 1980

Haverton Hill

haverton-s

The yard was built during 1917 on eighty-five acres of low-lying land, with much of the construction work done by women, ex-servicemen and Irish navvies.

The River Tees – R Woodhouse 1991

The link below is to an article in the Evening Gazette detailing the hundreds of women employed in the construction of the Furness Yard, illustrated with wonderful photographs from the British War Museum archive.

Localism: How Tees women outclassed men in WW1 construction – and were drawn into mainstream employment