Into the Tabular Hills

The Old Wifes Way – Newgate Brow – Newgate Moor – Grime Moor – Bridestones Griff – Needle Point – Dove Dale – Staindale – Adderstone Rigg

the old wifes way1

The Old Wife’s Way has always been a bit odd, today is no exception. The plane owner gives us a wave. We later see him flying over the fields.

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We follow the Prehistoric Dyke along Newgate Brow. I will never tire of this view.

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We leave the track and cut out onto Grime Moor, a slow worm scuttles through the shimmering red grass. An undisturbed barrow occupies the high ground

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After crossing a large enclosure, we choose to follow the less trodden path around the High Bridestones.

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The Low Bridestones on the opposite side of the valley. The steep-sided valleys of the Tabular Hills are called Griffs. They are the product of ancient climate change. The melting of the permanent ice during the last Ice Age caused lakes to build up behind ice dams, when the dams finally burst, huge torrents of water and debris formed the valleys that we see today.1

One folktale concerning the origin of how the Bridestones got their name concerns a pair of newlyweds who died after spending the night in one of the shallow caves that exist beneath a number of the stones.

There is some debate on precisely how the Bridestones were formed. What we do know is that the the outcrops are composed of Calcareous Gritstone and Passage Beds and have been subjected to processes of erosion.

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We walk along Needle Point and drop into the beautiful meadows of Dove Dale and Stain Dale.

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We follow the road out of the dale to Adderstone Rigg to take a look at the Adder Stone. Within .5km of this massive stone there are two large Prehistoric Barrow Cemeteries, indicating that this was a significant location for the people who lived here during prehistory.

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We get lost looking for a track to return to the valley bottom, we notice a small sign that simply says Rachel Whiteread, intrigued we follow the path to a forest clearing…Nissen Hut..I had no idea this was here, just stunning, the highlight of my day.

 Nissen Hut

8 thoughts on “Into the Tabular Hills

  1. The Nissan hut was a real find. I must go look for it. The only time I ever caught a slow worm was in Newtondale. Beautiful creatures, they are.

  2. Ironopolis, a superb post, very enjoyable. I was once drawing in my sketchbook near Fylingdales in the mid sixties, when the installations were big white balls and the RAF Police roe the pages out of my book and told me to ‘bugger off’. I’ve still got one charcoal drawing they missed. Anyway I was escorted from the area. Not much of a claim to fame. What was the water, a pond? And the Nissen hut, what a find. You were blessed with that. All the best, John

  3. I can maybe see why you take the photo’s that you do – they tell the story of the day.
    And after looking at the large isolated rocks in the area, the concrete nissen hut is in its own way a kind of addition to them?
    Cheers for the day 🙂

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